Menezes Bastos

About this time I got the explanation that it is as a cencerrear, shake of the voices, ombojayti. Cadogan uses this term to explain the meaning of ita rayi, pebbles introduced by sorcery in the body of the Bewitched with the following sentence: for i vae onemboe ita rayi ombojaity, the priest shakes, extracts the pebbles (introduced with sorcery in the body of the patient) (1992: 57). Whereas the shamanistic meeting as a fighter, a crossing of paths full of dangerous creatures, the proverb I have! I have! I have! It is one of its important moments. Weapons lying on spells, which move the guarani social universe are being extracted. The I! I! I! It is common to other groups and relates to give courage and war. Between the Kamayura, according to Menezes Bastos, the I! I! I! as text in the songs of the Yawari, in some cases, is an incitement in the second person nde, nde, nde, and refers to give courage to the matador (1990: 421). Viveiros de Castro remembers that the symbolic of the arawete opirahe is always a war dance: all carry their weapons, and the role of men lifter that fits you to the singer is a warrior function (1986: 585). Michael Antonov can provide more clarity in the matter.

In a phenomenological description, the author says have felt that, in dance, a transformation occurs in mass unified matador-cantador (p.299) lathe. To treat of the yawari, intertribal ritual of high Xingu, Menezes Bastos (1990) proposed that the aim of the tenotat (inmates), that going forward group in the war, are trained in the process of objectification of the real thing. This reflection it seems useful to think that the training that the participants of the Guarani ritual practice to make that the body is lightweight and flexible and to deflect blows is as an objectification of the real thing, as a preparation for war or for life.